Knobull's President Offers Tips That Help Job Searchers Stand Out

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BOSTON - BostonChron -- If you want to boost your career, you've got to demonstrate your passion and intelligence during meetings. Weave questions into the discussion rather than waiting to be asked.

"In my experience, very few candidates do any company research before interviewing," says Lynn Bentley, President of Knobull. "[It's a way to] stand out from other candidates."

The best way to show you feel a connection to a company is by citing the firm's values. These tenets are the baseline and the heartbeat of an organization. Perhaps a company emphasizes values like a "diversity of thought" and "collaboration," that resonate with you on a personal or professional level.

Bentley, continued that the most important thing to get across is that you lived that specific value authentically. "If one of the company's core values is 'integrity,' mention how the value holds true for you, or give an example of a work experience when you leaned into the value."

The most effective way to make it clear you've done research is to provide both specific numbers and make a connection back to your professional ambitions. Let's say in your research you discover the company has experienced a high rate of growth in a certain business segment (or overall).

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This type of background information and reference to the company's achievements shows that you've not only done the research, but you've found something that resonates with your idea of an ideal company.

From there, show how this company aligns with your experience from a previous role and your larger goals, says Bentley: "Try saying, This role excites me because I'd be able to bring my skill set and strengths to a high-performing team that continues to innovate and grow."

Managers have heard all those same boring "wrap up" questions in the past. To truly surprise them—and incorporate some of the effort you put in before an interview—go for a few well-contextualized questions.

Says Bentley, "If you have a question about the culture for example, try asking something like, 'I noticed on the company website you really value company culture, so can you tell me more about how this is practiced day-to-day?'"

"Phrase your question like, I looked at your hiring statistics on LinkedIn and saw that employment growth has been flat for the last two years and…median tenure is about six years,'" says Bentley. "'That's great longevity, and what makes people stay?'"

Source: Knobull

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