The President Of Knobull Recommends Techniques To Navigate Around Workplace Roadblocks

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BOSTON - BostonChron -- Lynn Bentley, President of Knobull reported, "One dismissive remark from that negative department head or a backhanded comment from that passive-aggressive peer can send our brains spinning with emotions, anger, and internal dialogue that can consume our days and even nights.

Recent research showed that 80% of people who were on the receiving end of uncivil behavior lost work time worrying about the incident, and 63% lost work time attempting to avoid the person. Other than leaving the job, what can be done to navigate these inevitable workplace dynamics?"

Added research showed that most employed adults spend more time with coworkers than they do with family, and all of those hours together mean more time thinking about their jobs and the people associated with them. If we want to protect ourselves and the people around us from the fallout, we must improve our ability to navigate these situations more effectively.

When we have friction with someone else, we perceive it as a threat to our identity, sense of harmony at work, and even our career. Whether we are being chased by a bear or receiving a snarky email from a coworker, our body responds in the same way.

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Being on the receiving end of our coworker's perceived bad behavior, we often tell ourselves a story about what is occurring and why. These stories are often laden with emotions and critiques - feel truthful to us when they are based on our brain's sense-making attempts rather than facts.

If we want to step out of our stories and choose a response that may build our relationship instead of breaking it down, we need to create mental space. There is a mental checklist to walk through to help with coping.

Adopt a curious mindset and explore what we don't know about this situation, the person, and our possible role in things unfolding the way they did. Don't waste time trying to convince your colleague to change. Focus instead on what you can do differently. Acknowledge that you and your colleague won't always see eye to eye. Ask yourself, what if I am wrong? What assumptions am I making?

Instead of thinking you are fighting them, imagine being on the same side of the table working through this together. Adopt a growth mindset: believe that you have something to learn and that the dynamic can change.

Bentley concluded, "This approach creates a Map for workplace dynamics. It helps you easily identify where you're going and the best route to take. When there is an incident, and there will be, it will help you find the best alternative route. It is guaranteed to help you navigate through or around your biggest workplace roadblocks!"

Source: Knobull

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